Brontë, Juvenilia, Literature, Reviews, Uncategorized

Two Romantic Tales by Charlotte Brontë -Part Two: An Adventure in Ireland

In my last post, Two Romantic Tales by Charlotte Brontë -Part One: The Twelve Adventurers, I looked at the origins of the Brontës' famous twelve toy soldiers both on and off the page. Presented to Branwell in 1826 by the siblings' father, Patrick, these characters kickstarted the Brontë juvenilia on the page and were arguably the literary… Continue reading Two Romantic Tales by Charlotte Brontë -Part Two: An Adventure in Ireland

Brontë, Juvenilia, Literature, Reviews

The Young Men’s Magazine and Charlotte Brontë’s Strange Events

In 1826 Branwell Brontë was famously given a set of toy soldiers by his father, Patrick. It is well known that Branwell and his sisters, Charlotte, Emily, and Anne, each seized a soldier, named it, and went on to create a whole world centred on these figures. Charlotte chose Wellington, Branwell opted for Napoleon, Emily… Continue reading The Young Men’s Magazine and Charlotte Brontë’s Strange Events

Brontë, Literature

The Importance of the Child Author

When we think of the works of fiction produced by the Brontë siblings, we conjure up images of brooding anti-heroes, poor governesses, and wild Yorkshire moors. In short, we tend to think of Charlotte’s Jane Eyre, Emily’s Wuthering Heights, and Anne’s Agnes Grey, novels seemingly written by three lonely and isolated sisters in their family home against the backdrop of the harsh environment of northern England.