Brontë, Juvenilia, Literature, Reviews

The Young Men’s Magazine and Charlotte Brontë’s Strange Events

In 1826 Branwell Brontë was famously given a set of toy soldiers by his father, Patrick. It is well known that Branwell and his sisters, Charlotte, Emily, and Anne, each seized a soldier, named it, and went on to create a whole world centred on these figures. Charlotte chose Wellington, Branwell opted for Napoleon, Emily… Continue reading The Young Men’s Magazine and Charlotte Brontë’s Strange Events

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Brontë, Juvenilia, Literature, Reviews, Uncategorized

The Green Dwarf by Charlotte Brontë

The Green Dwarf: A Tale of the Present Tense is a novella by Charlotte Brontë. Finished on 2nd September 1833 when Charlotte was just 17 years old, it is part of the Glass Town saga, taking place just months before the creation of the Kingdom of Angria in early 1834, which would then become the principal… Continue reading The Green Dwarf by Charlotte Brontë

Harry Potter, Literature, Uncategorized

The End of Harry Potter?

Although this article briefly discusses the recently released film Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald, it is spoiler free, so relax and enjoy the read. Almost twelve years ago I was eagerly anticipating the final book in J.K. Rowling's fantasy series about her eponymous boy wizard, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. The expectation was phenomenal not just because the… Continue reading The End of Harry Potter?

Heritage, photography, Uncategorized

Adopt a Grave and Save Your Heritage Lest We Forget

Over the past few months I've been involved in the ongoing efforts to restore and preserve an historic graveyard. You can find a link to my previous posts documenting our efforts by clicking here. Over the past few weeks some of my fellow volunteers have been working hard on a project to commemorate those who… Continue reading Adopt a Grave and Save Your Heritage Lest We Forget

Brontë, Juvenilia, Literature, Reviews

Charlotte Brontë: The Lost Manuscripts

As regular readers of my blog will know, I'm obsessed with all things Brontë, however, there is a special place in my heart reserved for the Brontë juvenilia. Set in Glass Town, Angria, and Gondal, the Brontës penned their literary sagas from childhood, and despite being very different from what readers traditionally associate with the Brontës' adult… Continue reading Charlotte Brontë: The Lost Manuscripts

Literature, Reviews

William Thackeray’s Vanity Fair: Review

Introduction and Background I think it's safe to say that every bookworm has a very long list of books they'd like to read one day. I also think it's safe to assume that on this list there will be a fair few books that are constantly appearing on the types of "books to read before… Continue reading William Thackeray’s Vanity Fair: Review

Brontë, Juvenilia, Literature

What Would Charlotte Brontë Do?

It's safe to say that October hasn't been my most productive month with regards to blogging. I'm not participating in Victober as a new job has taken up most of my time, as has the essay I'm desperately trying to write on Charlotte's juvenilia. Vanity Fair, the monumental and magnificent novel by William Thackeray (a literary… Continue reading What Would Charlotte Brontë Do?

Heritage, photography, Uncategorized

Adopt a Grave and Save Your Heritage Part Six

It's been a few weeks since my last post about Windleshaw Chantry and the restoration of the surrounding graveyard. As regular readers will know by now, my mum and I have adopted a few graves as part of the adopt a grave project, and aim to help out with the actual restoration work (digging, weeding… Continue reading Adopt a Grave and Save Your Heritage Part Six

Brontë, Literature, Reviews

May Sinclair’s The Intercessor: A Brontë Inspired Tale of Terror

In addition to reading texts by the Brontës I also like to track down fiction inspired by this remarkable family. This includes re-tellings of their work, historical fiction about their lives, and literature inspired by the worlds of Glass Town, Angria, and Gondal. So step forward May Sinclair and her spooky story, "The Intercessor" (1911).… Continue reading May Sinclair’s The Intercessor: A Brontë Inspired Tale of Terror

Brontë, Literature, photography

The Brontë Parsonage

The Brontë Parsonage Museum was originally known as Glebe House when it was built in 1778-9. It's very first occupant was the Reverend John Richardson who died in 1791. Following Richardson's death, James Charnock officially occupied the Parsonage until his own death in 1819, but it remains unclear just how much time he actually spent… Continue reading The Brontë Parsonage